Canadian Journal of Arthropod Identification
 
 

Capniidae (Plecoptera) in Canada east of Alberta

CJAI 36 -- April 05, 2019
doi:10.3752/cjai.2019.36

D.K. Burton

| Abstract | Introduction | Materials & Methods | Checklist | Results and Discussion | Key to Genera | References | PDF | Cite |
 
 

 

Results and Discussion

Twenty-six capniid species in eight genera were recorded in Canada east of Alberta, based on a combination of specimens examined from the CNCI and UOG and records from the literature. These are listed in the checklist below (Table 1), with notes on their Canadian distribution. More detail on distribution and biology can be found in the species accounts associated with the photographic key, along with Canadian or North American distribution maps for each species.

A photographic dichotomous key is presented which will allow the user to separate the adults of all 26 species reported here. This key includes 8 species of capniids not covered by the key provided by Harper and Hynes (1971). Two species of Allocapnia, A. indianae (Harper and Harper 1983) and A. zola (Ross and Ricker 1971 - INHS) are added as a result of literature records. Six species are added, Isocapnia crinitia, I. integra, Capnia coloradensis, C. confusa, C. gracilaria and Utacapnia trava, as a result of the extension of the study area to include the provinces of Manitoba and Saskatchewan. The inclusion of a photographic key greatly enhances one's ability to identify specimens when compared to the simple line drawings available in Harper and Hynes (1971). For capniids that may be collected that don't match the specimens in this key researchers are referred  to the following references:  Allocapnia (Ross and Ricker 1971; Stark and Kondratieff 2012),  Capnia (Nelson and Baumann 1989),  Capnura (Nelson and Baumann 1987), Isocapnia (Zenger and Baumann 2004), Mesocapnia  (Baumann and Gaufin 1970),  Nemocapnia ( Stark et al. 2016), Paracapnia (Stark and Baumann 2004) and Utacapnia (Nebeker and Gaufin 1965).

This study confirms the presence of A. rickeri in Quebec, adds P. angulata to the New Brunswick and Nova Scotia fauna, P. opis to the Nova Scotia fauna and C. coloradensis to the Yukon fauna based on specimens present in the CNCI. Allocapnia illinoensis is added to the New Brunswick fauna based on specimens in the INHS. The species A. indianae is added to the Quebec fauna and P. angulata to the Prince Edward Island fauna based on literature records. The distribution of A. granulata, A. minima, A. pygmaea and P. opis are extended westward and the distribution of C. confusa and C. gracilaria are extended eastward based on recently collected and identified specimens in the CNCI collection. Further research needs to be completed in the northern areas of Ontario, Manitoba, Quebec and Saskatchewan to determine the northern range of capniid species in this study area.