Fig 100 (a).Ptilonyssus icteridius female dorsal habitus.

Fig 100 (b).Ptilonyssus icteridius female dorsum.

Fig 100 (c).Ptilonyssus icteridius female venter.

Ptilonyssus (=Paraneonyssus) icteridius (Strandtmann and Furman, 1956)

North American host records:
Emberizidae:
Piranga ludoviciana, Western Tanager (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Pence 1975)
Spiza americana, Dickcissel (Spicer 1977, 1987)
Sturnella magna, Eastern Meadowlark (Spicer 1987)

Icteridae:
Agelaius phoeniceus, Red-winged Blackbird (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Wilson 1964; Pence 1972, 1975; Knee et al. 2008)
Agelaius tricolor, Tricolored Blackbird (Strandtmann and Furman 1956)
Euphagus carolinus, Rusty Blackbird (Pence 1972, 1975)
Euphagus cyanocephalus, Brewer’s Blackbird (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Pence 1972, 1975; Knee et al. 2008)
Icterus galbula, Baltimore Oriole (Pence 1972, 1975; Knee et al. 2008)
Molothrus ater, Brown-headed cowbird (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Wilson 1964; Pence 1972, 1975; Knee et al. 2008)
Quiscalus quiscula, Common Grackle (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Wilson 1964; Pence 1972, 1975; Knee et al. 2008)
Sturnella magna, Eastern Meadowlark (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Pence 1972, 1975)
Sturnella neglecta, Western Meadowlark (Spicer 1978)
Xanthocephalus xanthocephalus, Yellow-headed Blackbird (Strandtmann and Furman 1956; Pence 1975)

Tyrannidae:
Myiarchus crinitus, Great Crested Flycatcher (Knee et al. 2008)

Diagnostic characteristics:
– two dorsal shields, podosomal and fused opisthosomal and pygidial shields
– posterior margin of podosomal shield is straight, occasionally a slight medial lobe is present
– opisthosomal shield is longer than wide, but not twice as long as wide
– opisthosomal shield without lateral excavation
– posterior margin of opisthosomal shield is invaginated forming an inverted V indent, occasionally it is rounded
– anterior margin of opisthosomal shield is straight
– st1 st2 and st3 off the sternal shield
– subapical ventral setal pair on tarsus IV are long heavyset inflated spikes
– six pairs of ventral opisthosomal setae
– four pairs of mesolateral setae
– mesolateral setae all approximately equal in length, there are not two pairs of setae that are twice as long as another setal pair
– subposterior pair of dorsal podosomal setae are as long or almost as long as the longest mesolateral setae
– paranal setae level with anal opening, paranal and postanal setae are equal or almost equal in length

References:
Knee, W., Proctor, H., and Galloway, T. 2008. Survey of nasal mites (Rhinonyssidae, Ereynetidae,
        and Turbinoptidae) associated with birds in Alberta and Manitoba, Canada. Canadian Entomologist,
        140
: 364-379.Pence, D.B. 1972. The nasal mites of birds from Louisiana III. The genus Ptilonyssus
        (Dermanyssidae: Rhinonyssinae) with description of a new species. Journal of Parasitology, 58: 790-795.
Pence, D.B. 1975. Keys, species and host list, and bibliography for nasal mites of
        North American birds (Acarina: Rhinonyssinae, Turbinoptinae,
        Speleognathinae, and Cytoditidae). Special Publications of the Museum Texas
        Tech University, 8: 1-148.
Spicer, G.S. 1977. New host records from avian nasal mites (Acarina: Rhinonyssinae,
        Speleognathinae). Journal of Medical Entomology, 14: 498.
Spicer, G.S. 1978. A new species and several new host records of avian nasal mites
        (Acarina: Rhinonyssinae, Turbinoptinae). Journal of Parasitology, 64: 891-894.
Spicer, G.S. 1987. Prevalence and host-parasite list of some nasal mites from birds (Acarina:
        Rhinonyssidae, Speleognathidae). Journal of Parasitology, 73: 259-264.
Strandtmann, R.W., and Furman, D.P. 1956. A new species of mite, Paraneonyssus
        icteridius,
 from the nasal cavities of blackbirds. Pan-Pacific Entomologist, 32: 167-173.
Wilson, N. 1964. New records and descriptions of Rhinonyssidae, mostly from New
        Guinea (Acarina: Mesostigmata). Pacific Insects, 6: 357-388.

back